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Planning
02-22-2011, 04:53 PM
i thought this was a good real. i agree with some of it and some of it i disagree, but read it any way and lets hear some of your comments.
ron
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NOW THEY'RE FEELING GUILTY

The "I-missed-Vietnam" Guilt


"The day I turned 19, I went down for my physical and had my
first and only experience of Army life. I took with me a
letter from Dr. Murphy, my childhood doctor, describing in
uncompromising detail the asthma that had been a major part
of my life up to 16."

Thus begins an article by Christopher Buckley in the
September issue of Esquire magazine - an article that should
spur millions of members of a generation of American men to
question a part of their lives that they had thought they
put behind them long ago. Buckley - the son of conservative
columnist William F. Buckley Jr. - describes in the article
how he had received a medical deferment from the Army, and
thus how he had escaped going to Vietnam.

The article is titled "Viet Guilt, " and it addresses itself
to those millions of young American men who did not go to
Vietnam - and who are beginning to realize, all these years
later, that by not going they may have proved something
about their own lack of courage - their own, lack of manhood
, if you will - that ought to make them very uncomfortable.
Enough words have been devoted to the moral issues of the
war. The point that Chris Buckley makes is that, if the
truth were really to be told, most of the men who managed to
stay home from Vietnam did not do so for reasons of morality
alone. Their real reason for not going was that they did not
want to die, did not want to get shot at. And they found out
that there were many ways to avoid Vietnam. Young men of my
generation got out of Vietnam because of college deferments,
because of medical deferments, because of having a "lucky"
number in the Selective Service birthday lottery that was
initiated toward the end of the war. Three million men of
fighting age went to Indochina during the Vietnam War; 16
million men of fighting age did not.

Buckley was one of the men who did not - and I was, too.
Reading his article made me realize the truth of the
emotions I have been feeling lately about that particular
subject. I sense a strong feeling - "shame" is not too
strong a word - among many men who did not go to Vietnam,
and perhaps now is the time to bring that feeling out into
the open.

Those of us who did not go may have pretended that we held
some moral superiority over those who did, but we must have
known - even back then - that that was largely sham. A tiny,
tiny minority served jail terms - the rest of us avoided the
war through easier methods. The men who went to Vietnam were
no more involved with the politics of the war than we were.
They were different from us in only two important ways: They
hadn't figured out a successful way to get out of going, and
they had a certain courage that we lacked. Not "courage" as
defined the way we liked to define it; not "courage" in the
sense of opposing the government's policies in Vietnam. But
courage in an awful, day-to-day sense; courage in being
willing to be over there while most of their generation
stayed home. When I meet men my age who are Vietnam veterans
, I find myself reacting the same way that Chris Buckley
indicates he does.

I find myself automatically feeling a little lacking. "I
have friends who served in Vietnam..." Buckley writes. "They
all saw death up close every day, and many days dealt with
it themselves." They're married, happy, secure, good at what
they do; they don't have nightmares and they don't shoot up
gas stations with M-16s. Each has a gentleness I find rare
in most others, and beneath it a spiritual sinew that I
ascribe to their experience in the war. I don't think I'll
ever have what they have, the aura of I have been weighed on
the scales and have not been found wanting, and my sense at
this point is that I will always feel the lack of it..." "I
will always feel the lack of it."

I think many of us are just beginning to realize that. I
know when I meet those men of my generation who did serve in
Vietnam, I automatically feel less worthy than they are; yes
, less of a man, if you want to use that phrase. Those of us
who did not have to go to Vietnam may have felt, at the time
, that we were getting away with something; may have felt,
at the time, that we were the recipients of a particular
piece of luck that had value beyond price. But now, I think,
we realize that by not having had to go we lost forever the
chance to learn certain things about ourselves that only men
who have been in war together will ever truly know.

Our fathers learned those things in World War II; our sons,
God forbid, may learn them in some future conflict. But we -
those of us who did not go - managed to avoid something that
would have helped form us into different people than we are
now. Buckley writes "by not putting on uniforms, we
forfeited what might have been the ultimate opportunity, in
increasingly self-obsessed times, of making the ultimate
commitment to something greater than ourselves. The survival
of comrades." But I think it may go even beyond that; I
think it may go to the very definition of our manhood. I
know that when I meet a man who, it turns out, has served in
Vietnam, part of me wonders whether he is able to read my
mind.

I don't know how widespread this feeling is among men of my
generation who didn't go; but I can testify that, at least
for some of us, it's there, all right. By Bob Greene

DaCapster
02-22-2011, 05:27 PM
I would have been bumped if I had divulged my athsma......I feel remorse for not sucking it up and doing what I wanted to do at the time.....but no guilt......

holescreek
02-22-2011, 05:42 PM
Although I enlisted in the Marines and served honorably doing my job to the best of my ability, I always feel "second class" to those who have served during conflict. Nothing happened during my tour except the Iran hostage crisis about 6 months before I was discharged.
Several years after I got out I saw some video footage of the US Marine Corps vehicles destroyed in the Beirut bombing. The numbers painted on the bumpers indicated my old unit. Talk about guilt.

ctdemolay0405
02-22-2011, 06:06 PM
i have felt this - not so much "viet nam guilt" because I'm way to young (23), but feel guilty of not pushing through some laziness. I went to NROTC boot camp, a week long introduction to navy life, sprained my ankle and quit. They would have paid for college after the first year. now i'm a year and a half out of college, with no job, trying to buy a house and waiting on my next job to start - wondering every few months what it would be like to have stayed and manned up, instead of wussing out.

If I wasn't in the beginning of starting my family, i would have signed papers by now, but i also don't want to put off my marriage and plans for kids in a few years for at least 4-6 years.

Flip-floped about the Nat. Guard.... right now i'm in the middle of the application processes for Police departments around the state - hopefully i'll be able to prove to myself my worth someday.


It reminds me of what Regan said: “Some people wonder all their lives if they've made a difference. The Marines don't have that problem.”

Lalvis
02-22-2011, 07:47 PM
It's never to late. I joined the Navy at age 25. Did my 8 years. Got out because they got way to feelings for everything. Not what I grew up with when my dad did his 26 and out. They where throwing guys out for walking home after drinking at the enlisted men's club! I got out before I was charged with anything. We use to watch out for our ship mates. :icon_neutral:

cwo4uscgret
02-22-2011, 08:36 PM
Ah yes, the Viet Nam Guilt Trip.

Although from April 1972 until May 1974 I was stationed onboard the USS MIDWAY (CVA-41) and the during my first 11 months on her we were away from Alameda, CA for 10 months, 3 weeks of which we spent 205 days in the Tonkin Gulf; and while homeported in Yokosuka, Japan from October 1973 till May 1974 we spent most of our time off the Coast of Viet Nam, I felt as if I wasn't really a "true" Viet Nam Vet.

Heck, we had food service 23 out of 24 hours, CCTV, air conditioning, mattresses (albeit 6" of foam), we also had (in the first WESPAC) a total of 27 KIA, MIA, Confirmed POW, lost at sea, and 5 dead on a flight deck crash.

I never felt as though I was really a Vet until one day I finally had this realization: I did my part; I was there. I am grateful that I didn't have to go through what many people did; but I did do my part - so I don't feel guilty about it anymore.

jfowl31
02-22-2011, 08:48 PM
It wasn't Vietnam, but I graduated HS in 2002, went to college, dropped out, contemplated joining the Army, continued working instead, got married, and now have a kid on the way and I'm back in school.

Don't regret a single bit of any of it, because I might not be exactly where I am today if I had enlisted, and I wouldn't want to be anywhere else.

drine
02-22-2011, 08:50 PM
Peace time here too. Grenada went down the day we graduated jump school. I was out in 1987 and things heated up after. Panama, 1st Gulf, etc. As gungho grunts in basic one of us made the mistake of telling a DI we hoped we would get to fight. This guy was a rather short fella of Hawaiin decent. He was a Huey pilot in the Nam and had been off flight status for about 6 years and for whatever reason decided DI school was a good idea. Anyway, he proceeded to get agitated at the thoughts of someone hoping to go fight. He calmed a bit and proceeded with as fine a speach as I've ever heard about the joys of life and the many guys he knew who didn't make it out. He said he hoped none of us would ever know the horror but if called we should "Drive on with a..........on" SFC Ancog was his his name IIRC. There's a good saying about the old regretting the decisions of the young with both being the same person.

7.62guy
02-22-2011, 09:40 PM
folks that missed out as i have heard it said, because of true medical issues and even objectors of the war on religious belief, i have no issue with and don't think they should beat themself up for it. on the other hand those that ran to canada and those that forgave them i will never be right with. :nonono:

Norton
02-22-2011, 10:18 PM
This was my personel perspective and Memory. In the 1970s most Blue collar American teenagers thought of the Vietnam Vet as 'Cool or Tough' They did not seem like like WW 2 or Korean Vets. Now I can see why..
(they were only 5 to 10 years older) But at 15 you look at the world through a deferent lense. they were they guys with a the new Trans Am, Corvette, Mach 1, Norton or Harley. They seemed to me to have a devil may care attitude. Again I may be totally off base.. But that is what I thought at the time. When I went to Basic in late 1979 most of the Drill Sargents were Vietnam Vets and we held them in high respect. There was one guy in our platoon who was re-enlisting after serving in the War. The job prosepects in 1979 were bad all over and he said the Army would always give him Three hots and a cot..
Anyway I think all those late 1970s and early 80s war movies changed the Vietnam Vet's public image from cool dude with sideburns and Trans Am to Crazy Guy wearing a field Jacket with a Chip on his shoulder.
It seemed so far from the truth. Most of the people I knew that served in Vietnam seemed squared away and had alot going for them

wandering_ronin
02-23-2011, 09:13 AM
I joined the Guard at the ripe old age of 31, because I woke up one day and realized time was running out. I knew if I did not at least try, I would always wonder if I would have been able to hack it. I volunteered for Bosnia when The MSARNG's time for a tour came up for pretty much the same reason. Here was a chance to "do soldier stuff". When we got home, I decided to just finish my time and get out. Turns out the day I got my discharge, my unit got activated for Iraq. I did not go, and for awhile felt extremely guilty for it. I still have my regrets, but I also look at things in my life now and realize that had I gone some of the best things probably would not have occurred.

okie shooter
02-23-2011, 10:08 AM
I read a intersting comentary a while back with thoughts simular to this one, that the best and brightest of the nation used to train for service in times of wars. The departure came after WWII, and was seen in Korea, and later conflicts. At one time most colleges had robust ROTC or other military programs offical or unoffical to promote national service to include the places considered the cream of the crop private and public universties. It seems for some reason that the motivation ended after WWII, the sons of society and such had a change of heart(maybe due to the carnage and brutality of WWI and II, compared to the romaticized armies of prior wars) and the thought of sending your son of the rich and powerfull seemed to fall out of favor. This leaves the thought of fighting wars up to the poor and professional fighters we have today(heck even the draft was still skewed to allow outs for the rich and powerful,

Ironically Al Gore takeing of a enlistment was part of a political choice for the family, with the power and such his father could have kept him out of Vietnam) I guess a example was the service of the Keneady family and WWII compared to the lack of military service to the nation seen since then by suceeding generations. It maybe a sad commentary, that those who should be leaders in the military opt out for busness, or politics and such even in the face of pubilc needs and duty. Ironically congress had to order many

I feel no guilt as I am too young for the Vietnam era, my family did serve in both WWII, Korea, Cold War, and Vietnam, with mulpital members serving to include fathers, brothers, uncles, cousins and such. I was luck as I never sweated a Selective Service Number drawing, bearly even remembering them.

1st Cav
02-23-2011, 10:36 AM
Member here for a few months helped with old Cetme first post. Drafted and went to Nam as radioman. There should be no guilt among those not chosen. I know the problem but as a result of things brought home it caused lifelong problems. Major one choosing no kids due to agent orange , so count your blessings and look to other sections of your life.
only issue I have is with the draft dodgers that went to Canada and got a free pass to come home. I'm sure some buddies of mine would have enjoyed a pass instead of a bodybag. Even if the government had a trial and found them not guilty I would have accepted it better.
Sorry to vent but needed it thanks.

RicePaddyDaddy
02-23-2011, 09:30 PM
Member here for a few months helped with old Cetme first post. Drafted and went to Nam as radioman. There should be no guilt among those not chosen. I know the problem but as a result of things brought home it caused lifelong problems. Major one choosing no kids due to agent orange , so count your blessings and look to other sections of your life.
only issue I have is with the draft dodgers that went to Canada and got a free pass to come home. I'm sure some buddies of mine would have enjoyed a pass instead of a bodybag. Even if the government had a trial and found them not guilty I would have accepted it better.
Sorry to vent but needed it thanks.

I agree.Joined the Corps in high school,graduated went to boot camp,on to Lejuene then Pendleton and 20 months in Viet Nam.I was (was is the key word) young and stupid,only reason I joined was to leave home/see the world.I did not know the meanings of words like honor,pride or service until I joined the Marines.Just a big,dumb kid wanting to travel.

97th Signalman
02-23-2011, 11:51 PM
I volunteered for the Army in 1960 and served 3 years active duty and came home in 1963 after spending 31 months in Germany. I actually enlisted to get my choice of duty station (Germany) to avoid going to Korea where they sent all the two-year draftees. All this happened because I flunked out of college in 1960 and with the military obligation on everyone's horizon, it seemed like the best time and way to fulfill mine. So I served three years active duty and three more as "file cabinet reserve" unitl my 6-year obligaton was met. The details of my duty, which was pretty interesting and sastisfying, can be found elsewhere in this fourm.

Because of the timing of my service, my obligation was fulfilled by the time my friends were going to Vietnam. Obviously, I couldn't possibly have known that my choices would result in not having to go to Vietnam. Do I regret it or feel that I missed out on something? Never for one moment have I felt that. I am actually grateful that I never had to go. I enjoy telling about my experiences in Germany because I enjoyed living them. My friends who served in Vietnam almost never speak of their experiences because I think they find the memories too painful. As grateful as I am for their service, I am even more grateful that I don't have their painful memories.

I never went to Canada. I never had a deferment. I never protested. I never burned my draft card or the flag. But I never had to make any of those choices and for that I am grateful. This perspective may not be very poplular on this forum, but this is how I feel.

1st Cav
02-24-2011, 10:48 AM
Forgot to mention yesterday as I was caught up in the moment ; but want to say thanks to all that served where ever. I think 97 signalman has it right.
Out

Old Grump
02-24-2011, 11:21 AM
Some people are men, (or women), and step up to the line, take the oath, wear the uniform honorably, combat action or not they served their country honorably. Then there are those feeling guilt. Boo hoo, I don't want to hear it.

If you had epilepsy or couldn't breathe or had a bad heart or a bum leg but were being good decent law abiding and productive citizens and not denigrating those who were or are in uniform I salute you. :America:

Those of you who were otherwise healthy and took the opportunity to party hearty while good people did their duty in your place and now you regret it, tough apples. It's to late for apologies. :nonono:

Lalvis
02-24-2011, 11:42 AM
You got it just right Grump!:America:

MJ11
02-24-2011, 02:49 PM
I can't speak for everyone but one point overlooked is we didn't want anyone who would rather bug out with us. No ill will here I just didn't want anyone around I couldn't trust then or now. Today I spend time with classmates and if they don't bring it up I sure don't but they do all the time.At our last ,45th, reunion those that didn't serve honored those that did by reading our names and thanking us by honoring those that gave all with a minute of silance. It was moving but I feel I belong to a club they can never join and we in this club can spot another member from accross a room and having never met exchange a look or nod of the head and know them as brother.
Strangers will come up to me on the street and ask what years quietly as if something is written on my face to tell them I was there. That is a special thing.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v130/montereyjack/e959e4ac.jpg

SteelCore
03-09-2011, 10:23 AM
Better that that generation have "Viet Guilt" than be phonys who claim they are VNVs. Fake vets pi$$ me off, always fun when they get called on the carpet.

Phirebug
03-09-2011, 09:15 PM
I was IN a war and I still feel some of that guilt at times. We had it so much better than generations past. Sure we got shot at and blown up but then we went back to our air conditioned (sort of) rooms and played XBOX. I remember one time getting back from a real crappy mission and watching the Bastogne episode of Band of Brothers on my flat screen and thinking what the $#&@ am I complaining about?

xrayjuan
03-11-2011, 10:34 PM
I donít feel any animosity towards those who decided to stay, but I can stand those who at that time criticized the one who went, hell I donít want my son to go to that type of experience, but if the time comes , I will be there proudly helping him pack and praying for him. The only thing that still brings mixed emotions , proud and a little envy is to see how our heroes today are praise in public places when they are in uniform.:America:

SteelCore
03-15-2011, 09:39 AM
Yeah, poor treatment of returning vets is complete BS, and enfuriating. There was a bit of that with vets from ploice actions like Panama (ranger bud o mine) and others, they 'can neither confirm nor deny'... can't really talk about it.

kagans
03-17-2011, 01:20 PM
I have had ear issues ever since I was born, I cannot swim with out plugs or dive very deep. I Would love to serve in the Marines like My grandfather great grandfather etc.. But I worry I would be too much of a hindrance. I guess I have a bit of "Missed-Iraq" guilt even though I am only 24. Sometimes I find I beat myself up for being here in safety while my "brothers" go die. If there was a draft though, I'd like to think I would in-list instead of waiting to get drafted.

Old Grump
03-17-2011, 05:23 PM
I have had ear issues ever since I was born, I cannot swim with out plugs or dive very deep. I Would love to serve in the Marines like My grandfather great grandfather etc.. But I worry I would be too much of a hindrance. I guess I have a bit of "Missed-Iraq" guilt even though I am only 24. Sometimes I find I beat myself up for being here in safety while my "brothers" go die. If there was a draft though, I'd like to think I would in-list instead of waiting to get drafted.
You have nothing to be guilty about. Just be a good citizen and support the troops that can serve.

Nazgul
03-17-2011, 05:47 PM
I guess I feel guilty because I was born right after the Tet offensive.

Bad Monkey
03-17-2011, 11:14 PM
I almost enlisted in the Marines after high school. Decided against for a few reasons. Sometimes wonder if I should have. But then again I wouldn't have the life I have now. Plus there are other ways to serve, other then just in the military. And no I'm not talking peace corp. If ya are feeling guilty about not serving in the military, find a local charity and volunteer. Or even at a local school. Contact Big brothers and Sisters and help a kid out, or go to Purple Heart or some other vets. group and help out in whatever way needed. There are many ways to make this a better country, but we have to do it.

Just my .02

Girth
03-17-2011, 11:52 PM
I joined the National Guard while I was a senior in High School(2001). Thought I wanted to go to college, but never did. I was a lifelong aviation nut so chose an appropriate MOS (15G). Spent 8yrs in on a 6yr enlistment, after being stoplossed for a deployment. No guilty feelings, but I can honestly say that deployment was a joke. Spent 10 months in Kuwait. As an airframe guy in a GSAB Blackhawk unit...well there isnt a lot of work to do. Spent a LOT of time reading books, playing video games and watching movies. Thank god we were there though, otherwise Chuck Norris, the Pussy Cat Dolls, Disturbed, Jessica Simpson and Carlos Mencia would have had to ride in TRUCKS rather than our UH-60As.

It was a good experience though. Took the skills I learned and am now a CIV contractor keeping the black helicopters flying. VA loan let me buy my house easy, and my skill set ensures I can support my family.

IIRC the age cutoff for enistment (at least in the Army) is still 45 or thereabouts, so if you REALLY want to do it....go for it! ;)

BTW....Kuwait is a country I hope I never see again. I knew it sucked being there when I ran into guys who dropped in after being shot at/mortared only days before up North and THEY were complaining that it sucked.

kagans
03-18-2011, 08:02 AM
Thanks, I try to do what I can.

Airmedic6
03-18-2011, 08:18 PM
I really enjoy this forum and there is always something interesting to read and/or comment on. There have been alot of emotions expressed here and I thought I would add my 2 cents into it. I've been deployed several times and had the opportunity to fly med evac into other areas the government gets involved in - I am glad I serve and appreciate it when some one out of the blue comes up and says thank you. Now that I live in the greater DC area - fairly close to Walter Reed and get to see almost daily the remains of the guys trying to put their lives or whats left of it back together I think anyone that has an opportunity and feels guilty or not should spend some time in some way contributing to those that will live with their wounds the rest of their lives. I know the Viet Vets got a raw deal but I am also afraid that as things wind down and I hope they do that these guys will become the cast offs of this generation.

brewskzilla
03-20-2011, 01:29 PM
Remember what Shakespeare said: And gentlemen in England now abed shall think themselves accursed they were not here; and hold their manhoods cheap whilst any speaks who fought with us upon Saint Crispin's Day.

That is a truth undeniable. No matter what war or conflict it may be, those who deliberately shirked the call of duty as either a patriot or a man will feel the guilt in their very soul one day.

pmanton
03-21-2011, 04:30 PM
I was Med-evacued in Aug 68. Went from an evac hospital in RVN to a hospital in Japan. When I was released we went back to CONUS in a commercial airliner filled with people who had been wounded. We landed at an AirForce Base in California. From there I grabbed a commercial flight home on leave, then to my next duty station.

I finished my 20 in 1975 and retired from Ft. Lewis in Washington. All this time no one what so ever said boo to me. Nothing---nada--

Fast forward to a couple years ago. A chap noticed my RVN Campaign Ribbon sticker on my bumper and came up to me and shook my hand. He told me "Welcome Home".

That really made me feel like a million. It was hard to keep my eyes dry.

That single incident changed my outlook about my Viet Nam service I'm now a life member of VFW, MOPH and MOAA .

(and of course NRA)

Cheers:

Paul
Salome, AZ

brewskzilla
03-27-2011, 02:42 PM
Yes, it's comforting to know that there are always people that will recognize service, no matter how long ago, and thank you for it as though you just came home yesterday.

CGSteve
04-22-2011, 04:18 AM
Ah yes, the Viet Nam Guilt Trip.

Although from April 1972 until May 1974 I was stationed onboard the USS MIDWAY (CVA-41) and the during my first 11 months on her we were away from Alameda, CA for 10 months, 3 weeks of which we spent 205 days in the Tonkin Gulf; and while homeported in Yokosuka, Japan from October 1973 till May 1974 we spent most of our time off the Coast of Viet Nam, I felt as if I wasn't really a "true" Viet Nam Vet.

Heck, we had food service 23 out of 24 hours, CCTV, air conditioning, mattresses (albeit 6" of foam), we also had (in the first WESPAC) a total of 27 KIA, MIA, Confirmed POW, lost at sea, and 5 dead on a flight deck crash.

I never felt as though I was really a Vet until one day I finally had this realization: I did my part; I was there. I am grateful that I didn't have to go through what many people did; but I did do my part - so I don't feel guilty about it anymore.

What war it was doesn't really matter. I feel the way you felt about my service in Iraq. Though the nature of warfare has changed dramatically since Vietnam, I have feelings that I'm not a "true vet" either.

I was a Marine reservist with an artillery MOS who ended up being tasked to be on a convoy security team in al Anbar. We were based out of a large cushy FOB but we were outside the wire and on the roads most of our time there. Oddly enough, running convoys could be more dangerous than being a grunt as tactically, that is a great way for the enemy to hit you. Training don't matter. You could be a cook or a CAG operator riding in a truck that hits an IED and you are done.

Our convoy only took one IED hit, and it was to one of the transport semis we were "protecting". One third country national died from his wounds from the hit. I was one of two scout vehicles in our convoy. To this day I don't know how Scout 1 didn't run over the IED, and barring that, how we (Scout 2) didn't run over it. We found pieces of it afterward, it was not a command det type, but a pressure switch variety. The truck that took the hit was like #60 in the convoy.

We were always lucky in that the mines or IEDs in the road were discovered by convoys in front of us and we just had to wait for EOD to clear it. For all those hours that we sat on the roads, we were never ambushed or attacked.

Even when we were traveling with Iraqi Police or army recruits we never were attacked (for a time the insurgents wanted to target them more than us for supporting the then new Iraqi govt.) while other convoys with them traveling the same roads were. I mean I'm glad obviously, but I just don't get it.

It sucks to say it but I'm glad it was just a TCN truck driver and not one of us that was killed. I would be devastated had it been because it was our job as scouts to look for those things, even though they're damn near impossible to spot even at "slow" speeds unless it was placed by super amateurs.

Yes, we played our infinitesimal part over there and we are technically veterans even though we played no part in any major operations, we weren't even grunts or even active servicemen for most of our contracts.

I think the last two gets me more as it seems to me because life is easier in general today, we feel we have to do crazier things to prove we're tough and we've got balls and I took the lite route.
It seems like a "shrug" would suffice to sum up my military experience.

AURktman
05-02-2011, 07:29 AM
I went in in 1993 (graduated HS in 1992) and served until September 2000. IRR after active duty until May 28, 2001. Got in too late, got out too early. I would have gone back in but I broke my foot badly while in and spent the last year on/off profile for it. Didn't re-enlist as I was an 11M and if you can't run, the infantry don't need you.

I do have a bunch of guilt over it. Currently, I am finishing my PhD, teach at a university, and work in some of the most fun stuff imaginable. I would trade it all for a year in Afghanistan/Iraq as an 11M.

My little brother spent a year in Afghanistan, it was hard seeing him go off and I had to sit on the porch.

Old Grump
05-02-2011, 01:48 PM
No guilt necessary, you went, you served and now you are in a position to teach our side of the equation. You were probably meant to be where you are, take advantage of it.