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Thread: Ndm-86

  1. #1
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    Ndm-86

    With all the talk I've been seeing around about FEG possibly building some SVD's, I decided to break out my NDM today for some pictures and range time. Unfortunately, I ran out of time to make it to the range but I did get some decent pictures to share. While I was at it, I decided to throw in some of the glass I've collected too. When I got it all laid out, it occurred to me how much junk I've hoarded over the years. I gotta' stop buying stuff because it won't be too long before it's time to start getting rid of it all. This is just the rifle and scopes. The accessories and scope cans is another mess altogether. I think half the fun of having these rifles is all the crap you can buy for it:





    Here's just the rifle with the scope that it left the factory with:





    Exploded view:



    I always liked the way it looked like a cutaway with one handguard removed:



    The scope number is stamped into the stock:



    Scope number:



    The abbreviated serial number is all over the place on these rifles. Here, we see it on the bottom of the cheek rest:

    Notice that, while Chinese, this is not the proper cheek rest. It's long gone unfortunately. The rest of the parts are matching though.



    Trigger group and safety lever:



    It's hard to read but it's electro-penciled on the push rod:



    Inside both handguards:



    On the gas cylinder:



    Bolt carrier:




    Bolt (ignore the Swiss grease please):



    Underneath the rear sight leaf:



    On the barrel:



    At the back of the top cover:



    And, of course, on the receiver where we also see the year of production, the arsenal marking and the whole serial number:

  2. #2
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    In my limited experience, I've found that Chinese firearms are almost devoid of proof marks and this NDM-86 is no exception. It does seem to have a few more extraneous marks than I am used to seeing but they are pretty sparse.
    Here, we see a couple of......something on the side of the receiver:



    And a couple more marks on top the receiver that are normally covered by the top cover:



    A barrel alignment mark that doesn't seem to align with anything:



    The rest of the marks seem to be nothing more than a random single digit here and there. I'm sure they mean something but we'll never know.
    A "4" at the rear of the receiver:



    A "5" on the side of the barrel:



    Another "5" on the bottom of the flash hider. It's hard to read because of the thick shiny paint they used on these rifles:

    That's about it for obvious markings.

  3. #3
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    One of the things that's always amazed me about the SVD is how crudely it appears to be made. The Chinese ones look even more crude than the Soviet ones although I think some of that is attributable to the funky gloss paint they use. It just makes them look cheap. But even it you stripped them to bare metal, they would still appear to be rough. I keep saying "appear" because it's all an illusion. Where it counts, they are quite well finished. No, they are still not up to western standards but there is plenty of care put into the important bits. Let's look at some of the rough bits first.
    Notice the machining marks behind the breach:


    But also notice the finely turned threads on the barrel and the precision cutting at the rear of the barrel.


    The scope rail and lightening cut on the right side of the receiver is nothing to look at:






    But it's perfectly dimensioned and every optic I've ever tried slides on smooth as glass no matter what Warsaw Pact country it was made in. Of course, this included the scope that came with the rifle.

    The flash hider looks like a teenager's high school shop project:







    But the front sight is perfectly fitted to its dovetail:



    Here is the ejector and bolt hold open area:

    It's as rough as a cobb yet the bolt slides along as if SIG made it. I don't understand that one!



    A lot of work went into the bolt and carrier though. They are VERY well executed. Again, ignore the grease in these shots. This is just a quick and fun write-up. If it were intended to be one of my "in-detail" write-ups that would have been wiped off, and I'd be going into a lot more detail:













  4. #4
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    No short cuts with the gas piston:



    The gas cylinder is well made where it needs to be too:



    When you fit them together there is about as much play as you will find in the gas chamber of an HK P7:



    The trigger group looks like a cobbled together stamped steel contraption:



    But the mating surfaces of the sear and hammer are buttery smooth which creates a wonderful trigger pull:








    This last picture always gives me a chuckle. The Chinese so closely copied the Soviet rear sight leaf that they even reproduced the Cyrillic character for the 300m battle setting:




    That's it for this. Normally, if I were doing one of my usual "in-detail" write-ups, I would go MUCH more in-depth and discuss every little thing, pointing out details and explaining (to the best of my ability and understanding) what everything is and does. But that wasn't the purpose here. My intention was stated at the beginning of this.....I had it out and I took some pictures to share.
    Eventually though, I do plan on doing an in-depth look at this rifle. Anyone who recognizes me knows that I've been doing this for at leastt ten years now. I've done a bunch of in-detail essays and they've gotten buried in forum content over the years. But I've been told by enough people over the years (by both readers and people who have contributed firearms for study) that my work is useful and has some minimal Quality too it; enough that I've been convinced that it should be easily accessible and preserved. To that end, I've seriously considered creating a website for my past and future work. Doing this will incur some monetary expense and a considerable time expenditure. Of course, I would need to produce a more polished product than I have to this point. It would be similar but would need to address the large number of grammatical errors usually present.
    But, just like you, I have a career, family, house and all the responsibilities that go along with those things. SO, if I do create a website, I'll be creating a Patreon (or similar) account too. If I can get some support, I can make a website fly. I want your honesty. Assuming I produce on a regular (roughly monthly) basis, are my write-ups worth a buck or two a month to you guys? Again, this thread should not be used as an example. You all know how in-depth I usually go and it's much deeper than shown here. My typical essays take me about a week from start of photography to typing the last word. I'm asking....is my work worth any monetary support? If I get enough of you guys saying "I'm interested", I'll get to work on a website this fall. In fact, I already have a name but I'm keeping that to myself for the time being. SO tell me, interested or waste of time. Thank you in advance for your consideration!

  5. #5
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    scottz63's Avatar
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    Very nice write-up and pics as always! Love these from you!
    14EH AIT Instructor-PATRIOT Fire Control Enhanced Operator/Maintainer

  6. #6
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    Thanks buddy!

  7. #7
    Senior Veteran Windy's Avatar
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    Impressive! I've not seen an indepth and up close look at the NDM... now I feel like I have!

    Great job Combloc.
    Luv me some cosmoline!

    Ears to the ground, nose to wind and my hackles are rising.

    “If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.” -Samuel Adams

  8. #8
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    Thank you sir!


    Here are a few pictures of the various NV scopes attached to show you just how crazy large they are. They are listed in order of appearance.


    Gen 0 NSP-2:

    This one requires a battery pack that is worn on the belt so that you are literally tethered to the rifle! It's also the only one that requires an active infrared source to function. This particular unit was Czech made but Soviet designed. Some of the parts actually have Cyrillic writing on them.


    Gen 1 NSP-3:

    Polish made. Another Soviet design and I would not be surprised if many of the parts were supplied by Russia as well.


    Gen 1 1PN34:

    Soviet made.


    Gen 1 1PN58:

    Soviet made.


    Gen 2 1PN51:

    Soviet/Russian made.

  9. #9
    New Recruit rppjr's Avatar
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    That is a beautiful rifle, and those optics all together in one picture... amazing

  10. #10
    Senior Veteran Don in IA's Avatar
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    Nice rifle and write-up. I see the same things in my MAK90. Rough machining except where it counts, and a glass smooth trigger.

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