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Thread: I Think I Have a Colt Addiction

  1. #11
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    Now we're moving on to the rifles. None of these are police trade-ins or anything special; just plain jane civilian rifles. Also, none of them have dated barrels because I don't think Colt started dong that until about 1996. The first one we're going to look at is also the newest of the three and probably dates to around 1992-93 but that's just a guess. Certainly it was made prior to the 1994 Clinton ban.




    Notice that it has the "full fence" on the right side of the magazine well but it's not drilled for the front take down pin detent. That's because Colt was not making civilian rifles at this time with the pin. Instead there is a double sided screw installed. You can take it apart but you weren't supposed to.

    Left side of the receiver:

    This rifle is essentially an A2 HBAR but not marked as such. In the interest of it being seen as a purely sporting rifle, the "A2" designation was removed and it was remarked as a "Sporter Match". The serial number prefix is "MH" which stands for "Match HBAR" and the bayonet lug was removed. All of this was done because Colt could see the ban on the horizon and they were hoping to be excluded from it if they did enough neutering to the design. There were also other changes made but we're not going into all of that. Frankly, I'm not 100% sure of everything that was done. Still, we will see a couple more things that were done to permanently keep them semi-auto only as we move along.


    Barrel marking:

    Contrary to what you might read in some places, the "C" in front of "MP" stands for Colt, NOT Chrome or Chromed or Chrome Lined.


    Muzzle showing the correct for this period peel washer:



    Detail of the full-auto block:

    Receivers of this era did not have the web we are accustomed to seeing in newer receivers in order to block the installation of full-auto parts. SO, Colt put this block in place and held it there by drilling a hole in the receiver and inserting a pin. On this rifle, that pin can be seen four pictures above on the right side of the receiver just above the safety axle. Note that the pin does not pass through the left side of the receiver, only the right.


    A closeup of the small head forward assist still used today:

  2. #12
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    Moving back in time 21,792 rifles, we come to this jobber:



    For all intents and purposes, it's the same rifle as we looked at above but it's nowhere near identical. The first obvious difference is the complete lack of a fence on the right side of the lower receiver. This is basically just an SP1 receiver only marked differently. By the way, what the hell is that phone doing in there???? Shoddy photographic skills!!


    Left side of receiver:

    It's very similar to the previous rifle but again, there are differences. For one, notice that the full auto block pin protrudes through to this side where it did not on the other rifle. Yu can see it above word "FIRE". Also notice the little circles to the left and right of the safety. On the previous rifle those areas were more tic-tac shaped. There is a technical word for those thingees but it escapes me. I'm no expert on AR-15's. There is also a difference in reinforcement at the rear of the receiver where the buffer tube mounts but we'll look at that in more detail on the next rifle.


    Here is a closeup of the right rear of the lower receiver showing that the full-auto block pin passes through this side too:

    I guess Colt eventually figured out that you could just drive this pin out so they changed it to a blind pin at some point as seen on the previous rifle.


    Barrel marking:

    Same information but a different font and size.


    Again, a peel washer:



    When I bought this rifle, it had a leather "Colt" marked sling on it. It also had a Colt cheek riser on the stock and a Colt marked scope rail attached to the carry handle. At one point they offered a "Delta" version of this rifle that had these parts and a cheepie scope for a few bucks more. Apparently, someone wanted a Delta but either couldn't find or couldn't afford one so they tried to make this one. I took the cheek riser and scope mount off but left the sling as it works well enough. Here is a detail of the mark on the sling:



    The forward assist button is identical:



    The receiver block:

  3. #13
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    In this post, we're going to look at the oldest of the six Colt's shown at the beginning of this article:



    Of course, "old" is a relative term and I don't really see it as old. I'm old....but I digress.


    Left side of receiver:

    Notice that the serial number prefix is "SP" which stands for "Sport". This particular rifle was most likely made in 1986, the year the civilian HBAR was introduced and, while thare are a myriad of little differences between this rifle and the previous two, it's essentially just an earlier true "pre-ban" version of the other ones. Yes, they too are pre-ban rifles made in the early 90's but they had shades of what was coming. For example, this one is marked "AR-15 A2". That was eliminated around 1990 in an effort to make the rifles seem less military and more "sporting". Similarly, while the previous two have had the bayonet lug removed and a block added to the receiver, this one still has the lug and lacks a block. It's pretty much just a semi-auto only version of the rifle developed for the Marines. The lower receiver is the same one used on the SP-1 and I think it has the smaller diameter hammer and trigger pin holes too. I like it because it's marked for what it is instead of trying to hide behind the goofy "Match HBAR" title. I also really like that it's marked "COLT'S FIREARMS DIVISION".


    A neat feature is the large round forward assist button:

    This replaced the tear drop forward assist for just a very short time before being changed to the small button we are used to seeing today.
    Here is a small button for comparison:



    Notice that the rear of the lower receiver is much more svelte on these older jobbers:

    A newer receiver for comparison:



    The other side is also less reinforced:

    Compared to a newer one:



    Barrel marking:



    Muzzle:

    I'm pretty sure this should have a peel washer so that tells me some moron had the flash hider off at some point. I just don't get why people dicker with things. However, when we look at some old Colt catalogs in a bit, you'll see that it does look like some of the rifles do appear to have crush washers when we would expect a peel washer. That could be a trick of the lighting in the picture....I just don't know. If I've learned anything in my years of collecting, it's that you should always expect the unexpected. Still, I'm going with someone, at some point, had this flash hider off.


    No block, no web. Pure pre-ban:

    I miss those days.


    A particularly nice feature of this particular rifle are the glossy handguards, shown below in the foreground:

    And here, in the background:

    Of course, Colt didn't make these but rather bought them from subcontractors. Apparently, some contractors made pretty shiny ones while others made more dull ones, presumably because of differences in polymer formulas. I assume it was luck of the draw. I like shiny!


    The pistol grip on this rifle has a more polished look as well:



    A comparison of this rifle (at top of frame) to the previous rifle:

    Other than some rain drops on the receivers, they are nearly identical. The only obvious difference is the pin for the receiver block seen on the bottom rifle. But, if you look closely, you might notice the difference in trigger and hammer pin diameters.


    Compared to a current spec. FN-15:

    LOTS of little changes and some big ones too.

  4. #14
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    While we're here, we might as well look at some Colt catalogs. That's as good a way as any to wrap this up:

    I'm not going to do a page by page on these catalogs. We're looking at AR-15's so guess what we're going to look at in the catalogs.....


    This first one is from 1986:


    The rifle page from the '86 catalog:

    I don't really see the need to say much here as it kind of speaks for itself. Hopefully it's large enough that you can read it.


    The 1989 catalog:


    Rifle pages :


    These sure look like crush washers but I'm assuming it was just a trick of the light when the picture was taken because they should be peel washers. I cant imagine they were using both at the same time:




    The 1990 catalog:


    The rifle pages:

    Notice that Colt is going out of their way to portray them as nothing more than target rifles. This is the year they nixed the "AR-15" roll mark on the lower.

    There is a .22 conversion kit advertised too on page 12:

    Again, these are only for shooting at paper plates kids. Careful, or you'll shoot your eye out!


    1991:


    "AR-15" is absolutely nowhere to be found:

    Please mr. big gubment...don't take my "sporting rifle" away from me!! I swear, we only shoot at paper plates and would never use it to defend ourselves from tyranny. We're good compliant little citizens!


    Although it's not dated, I have it from an excellent source that this one is from1994:





    This one isn't overtly dated either but it's from 1995 because there is a copyright date on the back:




    No flash suppressor and the magazines are limited to 5 rounds. Pure libtardia.


    Inside is a 1995 price list and a goofy Colt clothing catalog:


    Even back then they were expensive. I was buying used HK's just a few years before this for just over half the price of a new Colt.


    Unfortunately, there is a big gap here. Sorry about that. This next one is from 2005:









    This last one is from 2010:











    This catalog has quite a spread compared to the earlier ones.



    And that's it for now. I hope you enjoyed this half as much as I did writing it! Until next time.....be safe, have fun and make sure you bring up how much you enjoy firearms in conversation every time you are around the libtards in your workplace because every time you piss one off, an angel gets his wings!
    Last edited by Combloc; 07-18-2019 at 09:31 PM.

  5. #15
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    Unknown is 1994--- the other is 1995 (same for 1996, except 1996 on the back cover)!!!

    Tony

  6. #16
    Senior Veteran Combloc's Avatar
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    Thank you Tony!

  7. #17
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    Awesome, Thanks!
    14EH AIT Instructor-PATRIOT Fire Control Enhanced Operator/Maintainer

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